Protect Our Prairie Grasslands!

The rolling hills, natural stone sculptures and life-giving waterways of southwest Saskatchewan and southern Alberta provide unique habitats for an incredible number of diverse species, including the Swift Fox, Burrowing Owl and Black-footed Ferret. But these prairie grasslands, and the species that live there, are under threat and need your help.

It might come as a surprise but the most endangered landscape on Earth isn’t Brazilian rainforest – it’s actually prairie grasslands. Over time, these grasslands have all but disappeared around the world due to industrial agriculture, sprawl, oil and gas activity, and climate change.  

The heritage ranchlands in Alberta’s Milk River watershed, along with southwest Saskatchewan’s community pastures in Govenlock, Nashlyn and Battle Creek, feature some of the largest tracts of native grass left. 

Continued ranching – a practice that replicates natural bison grazing – is an important part of keeping this landscape healthy.

Today less than one percent of the 137,000 square kilometres of grasslands in those two provinces is protected. In fifty years, these unique habitats may be gone. 

We have a window of opportunity to make a difference. Canada has pledged to double the amount of nature under protection by 2020.  With this deadline rapidly approaching, we need the federal government to make grasslands protection a priority! 

By adding your voice, we can show Ottawa that enough Canadians want to protect our prairie grasslands and the wildlife species that call it home.

Will you add your name?

Sign The Petition Today! 

 

Grasslands are the most endangered, the most altered, and least protected ecosystem on the planet. Canada’s prairie grasslands support over 60 different at-risk species, including the Burrowing Owl, the Swift Fox, and the Black-footed Ferret. 

I am proud of Canada’s commitment to double protections for nature by 2020. Canada’s prairie grasslands –and the wildlife that call it home— are a unique part of our heritage and economy, and must be an urgent priority for long-term conservation.

I urge the Canadian government to work with ranchers, First Nations and Metis organizations, and local communities to protect Canada’s vital prairie grasslands in Southwest Saskatchewan and Southern Alberta. The approach to conservation should respect Indigenous rights and provide local ranchers secure and long-term access for cattle grazing.

Sincerely,