Call on Jamaica to stop trying to silence Shackelia Jackson

 

JAMAICA:  PROTECT SHACKELIA JACKSON

She's facing intimidation for fighting for those who have been unjustly killed by the police.  

 

REFUSING TO LET POLICE GET AWAY WITH MURDER

Shackelia Jackson will not give up. When her brother was gunned down by police in 2014, she made sure that Jamaica’s independent investigators secured the crime scene.

The police had been pursuing a “Rastafarian-looking” suspect in a robbery, and Nakiea fitted that description. They found him in his small restaurant and shot him dead. Police killings of mainly young and mostly poor men is all too common in Jamaica, with some 2,000 killed in the past decade.

VICTIMS OF 
POLICE VIOLENCE
DESERVE JUSTICE

Shackelia was determined not to let Nakiea’s story end there. She has battled a badly underfunded, sluggish court system to lead a bold fight for justice. In doing so, she has rallied dozens of families whose loved ones have been similarly killed, amplifying their cries for justice. The police have responded by raiding her community, timing the raids to coincide with court dates. They have also intimidated Shackelia and her family.

But Shackelia refuses to be silenced. She says their attempts only reinforce her belief in what’s right. “I fight because I have no other choice,” she says. “To stop would mean I am giving another police officer permission to kill another of my brothers.”

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Dear Prime Minister,

I urge you to protect Shackelia Jackson and her family and ensure juwstice for all those unlawfully killed by the police. 

When her brother, Nakiea, was gunned down by police, Shackelia took on a sluggish court system to lead a bold fight for justice for his murder. In doing so, she rallied dozens of families whose loved ones were similarly killed. In response, the police have repeatedly raided and harassed her community. Police killings of mainly young and mostly poor men is all too common in Jamaica, with some 2,000 killed in the past decade. It’s time to end this scourge.



Yours sincerely,

  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
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